Wednesday, July 8, 2015

Judge Orders Cancellation of Redskins Trademark

Political Correctness Marches On

The Federal Government has now positioned itself for regulating whose speech is acceptable and whose isn’t. 

Fox DC
ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) -- For the first time in a legal battle that has stretched over 20 years, a federal judge on Wednesday ordered the cancellation of the Washington Redskins' trademark registration, ruling that the team name may be disparaging to Native Americans.
The ruling does not bar the team from using the Redskins name if it wishes. The team could even still sue for trademark infringement, but winning such a case could prove more complex without the legal protections that come with a federally registered trademark.
Redskins President Bruce Allen said the team will appeal.
"We are convinced that we will win because the facts and the law are on the side of our franchise that has proudly used the name Redskins for more than 80 years," Allen said in a statement.
U.S. District Judge Gerald Bruce Lee's ruling upholds an earlier finding by an administrative appeal board and orders the federal Patent and Trademark Office to cancel the registration. A group of Native American activists first challenged the trademark registration in 1992, and various administrative boards have ruled against the team before. But Wednesday's order is the first time that a federal judge ruled against the team and found that the name may be disparaging.